WaylonandWillie.com

The official website of Waylon Jennings
and
the official website of Willie Nelson Friendship
Waylon and Willie Music


This was the first official collaboration between Waylon and Willie.  This was Waylon's idea.  He was a marketing genius and felt like if he could package himself, Jessi, Willie and their buddy Tompall Glaser as a bunch of 'Outlaws' people might pay attention.  This was THE breakthrough album for all their careers.  The man was a marketing AND a musical genius.  He created an entire new musical genre by compiling a best of record.  Enjoy these videos that I've found online.  The beauty is - they are all here in one spot.  Plus, I pick ones with old photos that people have added.  Enjoy these for now. 



T for Texas - Tompall Glaser


Put Another Log on the Fire - Tompall Glaser




The Original:
My Heroes Have Always Been Cowboys (Waylon)
Honky Tonk Heroes (Waylon)
I’m Looking For Blue Eyes (Jessi)
You Mean to Say (Jessi)
Suspicious Minds (Waylon & Jessi)
Good Hearted Woman (Waylon & Willie)
Heaven And Hell (Waylon & Willie)
Me And Paul (Willie)
Yesterday’s Wine (Willie)
T For Texas (Tompall)
Put Another Log On the Fire (Tompall)
The Lost:
Slow Movin’ Outlaws (Waylon)
(I’m A) Ramlin’ Man (Waylon)
If She’s Where You Like Livin’ (You Won’t Feel At Home With Me) (Jessi)
It’s Not Easy (Jessi)
Why You Been Gone So Long (Jessi)
Under Your Spell Again (Waylon & Jessi)
I Ain’t the One (Waylon & Jessi)
You Left A Long, Long Time Ago (Willie)
Healing Hands Of Time (Willie)
The New:
Nowhere Road (Waylon & Willie)

The Liner Notes from this album include the notes from the original 1976 release, in addition to the following:

What a scene one recent night in February of 1996: magical guitar notes echoing out of a music row studio, Willie Nelson’s big tour bus “Honeysuckle Rose II” idling out in the alley, and in the studio, a regular rogues’ gallery of music legends.

There’s Dan Penn, who wrote such classic songs as “Dark End Of The Street,” resplendent in blue overalls and gimmie cap. Sitting beside him on the couch is Don Fritts, the renowned “Alabama Leading Man.” Kim Carnes just strode in and is saying hello to Willie’s harmonica player, Mickey Raphael.

Puffing away on a cigarette and sipping from a can of Dr. Pepper in the control room is the hyperactive Steve Earle, his eyes hidden behind black shades. Advancing on the microphone are the two main players in this drama, outlaws legends Willie Nelson and Waylon Jennings. They’re beginning to look like figures from Mount Rushmore: ragged and worn from the years, but looking more and more majestic.

Willie’s gimmie cap faces forward; Waylon’s is turned backwards. Earle, a true son of outlaw, bounces into the room, saying to Willie and Waylon, “If y’all have heart attacks at the same time, ten we’re set.” Willie and Waylon laugh at this bit of nonsense and turn their attention to lyric sheets for Earle’s song “Nowhere Road,” that they’ve decided to cut to add to the re-issue of “Wanted: The Outlaws,” their epochal album that revolutionized the world of country music. Earle is producing this session, at least in name, because no one really produces Waylon and Willie. By now, they’re just like forces of nature: natural and uncontrollable.

“You got any idea how to split it up Steve?” Willie asks, knowing all the while that he and Waylon will figure it out during the first take. Earle makes a suggestion and heads for the control room: “Let’s saddle up, everybody! It’s in A-flat, the people’s key. My body’s in G.”

They run through one take, those grizzled old voices as beautiful as ever. After a playback, Waylon grumbles, “I think we one better take in us. We have kicked the asses of writers and singers who have done less than that.” After another take, Willie grins impishly and says, “That was perfect! Let’s do one more.”
“That’s what Chet Atkins always used to say,” Waylon laughs.

Another magical take, and Earle comes in to hear the playback. “You know, Willie,” he says, “I saw you play the Silver Dollar in Pasadena before all these things changed with outlaws, especially in Texas. Half the people there wanted to dance and a bunch of hippies came in and sat down in front and just wanted to listen. One of the dancers kicked one of the hippies and it started to get ugly. Then, you stopped the show and said, ‘There’s room for some to sit and there’s room for some to dance.’ I liked that.” “Yeah,” Willie smiled, “I guess that’s part of what we did.”

They did that and more. That Outlaws record did a lot of things: it brought forth a young generation like Steve Earle; it blew the lid off the conservative country music establishment in Nashville; it introduced a vibrant new strain of country music to the world; and, it pushed the envelope of social and cultural worlds that country inhabits and informs. They showed there was indeed room for those that sit and those that dance.

Chet Flippo
Nashville Bureau Chief, Billboard Magazine

Title:  Wanted: The Outlaws
Waylon Jennings, Willie Nelson, Jessi Colter, Tompall Glaser
RCA Records: APL1-1321, January 1976
    
 
Original Liner Notes:

It’s unfortunate that there still has to be a sampler, or primer, or golden book of some of the best singers working anywhere, but apparently not everyone has gotten the message yet. Maybe this album can introduce you to some people you would have liked to have known sooner, but just didn’t have the opportunity to meet.

These are some special people, very special. They’ve been waiting in the wings for years, too many years, to assume their proper places in the structure of American music. When it became apparent to them that their proper places wee perhaps being unduly delayed because of certain resentments harbored against them because of their real and imagined unconventionality, they--by God--decided to take matters in their own hands. There resulted a rather difficult period of figurative doors being smashed and general confusion and namecalling in Nashville. When the smoke cleared and the fallout returned to Earth, there was effected a major shift in country music. “Progressive Country” (for want of a better term) was on the map, was here for good. And these are the people responsible for that. Call them outlaws, call them innovators, call them revolutionaries, call them what you will, they’re just some damned fine people who are also some of the most gifted songwriters and singers anywhere.

They are musical rebels, in one sense, in that they challenged the accepted way of doing things. Like all pioneers, they were criticized for that, but time has vindicated them.

Tompall Glaser was one of the first in Nashville to chart his own musical course and it was lonely for him for years, but now he is beginning to received the recognition due him.

Waylon Jennings, as the most visible of the progressive country pack, has been quietly fighting for years in his own way for acceptance. Both he and Jessi Colter (who, coincidentally, is also know as Mrs. Waylon Jennings) were authentically ahead of their time. Now, the times have caught up with them.

That streak of rugged individualism that is the unifying bond for these musical outlaws is nowhere more evident than in Willie Nelson’s life and times. Unquestionably one of the finest songwriters who ever lived, Willie was know for years only to other writers and to a slowly growing cult of followers. All that has changed now. “Miracles appear in the strangest of places,” Willie sings in “Yesterday’s Wine,” one of my favorites from his collection of remarkable songs. And that’s true. When I first started keeping track of Willie and Waylon and Jessi and Tompall, I (along with their other cult followers) felt almost responsible for them since they weren’t that well know to the public and the music industry as a whole didn’t like to acknowledge them. They didn’t wear Nudie Suits and their music didn’t conform to the country norm of songs of divorce and alcohol and life’s other little miseries. The only thing that worried me was that I knew these people were born scrappers and really loved fighting for acceptance. What would happen to them, I wondered, when they inevitably won (as I knew they would)? Would they, like so many who struggle just for the sake of the struggle, grow fat and lazy when they grew successful?

There was no need to worry. This past year, each of them has gotten better, writing better, and singing with a breathtaking confidence.

They’re the cutting edge of a brand of American music that I find the most satisfying development in popular music in the past decade. It’s not country and it’s not country-rock, but there’s no real need to worry about labeling it. It’s just damned good music that’s true and honest and you can’t ask for more than that.

Chet Flippo
Associate Editor, Rolling Stone




Title: Waylon & Willie 
(RCA Records: AFL1-2686, January 1978)



Original Liner Notes:

I have made serious mistakes before but probably the most serious was in underestimating the talents of a couple of ornery old coots by the name of Willie Nelson and Waylon Jennings. After the rest of the world finally caught up with their ornery music and finally started buying their records, I figured that what would probably happen would be this: Willie would sit at home with his grandkids on his knees and say things like, “Now, see this gold record? I got this for...” And waylon would retire to his mountaintop and become a burly recluse, coming into town once a year, on the day the new Cadillac hit the deals. Once a year they would appear on stage for a moment at the end of somebody else’s show and throw out a quick duet on “Good Hearted Woman.”

In other words, I thought that success--as that high goddess usually does--would dry up the well.

I should have know better, should have know that the two Godfathers of modern country music know a little bit better than I do what they are capable of, what they want to do, and what they think country music needs. What country music needs right now, I decided the minute I heard this album, IS this album. Some of the stuff that’s passing for country these days--no names needed, you and they know who they are--is nothing but a disgrace.

I humbly submit that the world needs a lot more Willie & Waylon right now and a whole lot less of that other crap.

I’ve not always approved of everything they’ve recorded, but when these two guys really crank it up, nobody--but nobody--can touch them. One listen to these songs made me a believer again. Willie & Waylon invoke the sheer beauty and power of real, honest country music as no one else does.

It’s a cliché, but a cliché I firmly believe in that wine, women, and song are the only worthwhile things this world holds. And I’m very happy that Willie & Waylon are again taking care of the song department, for there are times that song is better than wine or women.

--Chet Flippo (Associate Editor, Rolling Stone Magazine) 

Song list:
Mammas Don’t Let Your Babies Grow Up To Be Cowboys
The Year 2003 Minus 25
Pick Up The Tempo
If You Can Touch Her At All
Lookin’ For A Feeling
It’s Not Supposed To Be That Way
I Can Get Off On You
Don’t Cuss The Fiddle
Gold Dust Woman
A Couple More Years
The Wurlitzer Prize (I Don’t Want To Get Over You)

  1. Mammas Don't Let Your Babies Grow Up To Be Cowboys
    (Ed Bruce & Patsy Bruce)

    Cowboys ain’t easy to love and they’re harder to hold.
    They’d rather give you a song than diamonds or gold.
    Lonestar belt buckles and old faded Levis,
    And each night begins a new day.
    If you don’t understand him, an’ he don’t die young,
    He’ll probably just ride away.

    Mamas, don’t let your babies grow up to be cowboys.
    Don’t let ‘em pick guitars or drive them old trucks.
    Let ‘em be doctors and lawyers and such.
    Mamas don’t let your babies grow up to be cowboys.
    ‘Cause they’ll never stay home and they’re always alone.
    Even with someone they love.

    Cowboys like smokey old pool rooms and clear mountain mornings,
    Little warm puppies and children and girls of the night.
    Them that don’t know him won’t like him and them that do,
    Sometimes won’t know how to take him.
    He ain’t wrong, he’s just different but his pride won’t let him,
    Do things to make you think he’s right.

    Mamas, don’t let your babies grow up to be cowboys.
    Don’t let ‘em pick guitars or drive them old trucks.
    Let ‘em be doctors and lawyers and such.
    Mamas don’t let your babies grow up to be cowboys.
    ‘Cause they’ll never stay home and they’re always alone.
    Even with someone they love.
     
  2. The Year 2003 Minus 25
    (Kris Kristofferson)

    Welcome to the years 2000 minus 25
    Oh, say can you smell her for the smoke
    God’s still up there laughin’ so she’s gotta be alive
    Who says he can’t take a dirty joke,

    Power isn’t power does and power slips away
    It’s so easy to abuse
    Who’d’ve thought them Arabs would’ve bought
    The USA just to give it to the Jews.

    Singin’ crime still don’t pay just like it used to
    And you know that time slips away till you die
    Well, I don’t give a damn when I choose to
    No it don’t hurt so bad when you’re high.

    Oh, say does the future of the homesick
    And the brave even matter anymore
    There ain’t no more reason for them boys
    To run away than there was to fight before.

    Would you tell me why the hell we’d try to win back in a war
    What we wasted in the last
    Might just ain’t as righteous as it used to be before
    When your army’s out of gas.

    Singin’ crime still don’t pay just like it used to
    And you know that time slips away till you die
    Well, I don’t give a damn when I choose to
    No it don’t hurt so bad when you’re high.

    Singin’ crime still don’t pay just like it used to
    And you know that time slips away till you die
    Well, I don’t give a damn when I choose to
    No it don’t hurt so bad when you’re high.
      
      Live Version - not on album
  3. Pick Up The Tempo
    (Willie Nelson)

    Some people are saying that time
    Will take care of people like me
    That I’m living too fast
    And they say I can’t last much longer.

    But little they see
    That their thoughts of me is my saviour
    And little they know
    I might live forever.

    So pick up the tempo just a little
    And take it on home
    The singer ain’t singin’
    And the drummer’s been draggin’ too long.

    Time’ll take care of itself
    So just leave time alone
    And pick up the tempo just a little
    And take it on home.

    I’m wild and I’m mean
    I’m creatin’ a scene I’m goin’ crazy
    I’m good and I’m bad
    And I’m happy and sad and I’m lazy.

    I’m quiet and I’m loud
    And I’m gatherin’ a crowd and I like gravy
    About half off the wall
    But I learned it all in the Navy.

    So pick up the tempo just a little
    And take it on home
    The singer ain’t singin’
    And the drummer’s been draggin’ too long.

    Time’ll take care of itself
    So just leave time alone
    And pick up the tempo just a little
    And take it on home.

    Yeah, pick up the tempo just a little
    And take it on home. 
     
  4. If You Can Touch Her At All
    (Lee Clayton)

    Funny a woman can come on so wild and free
    Yet insist I don’t watch her undress or watch her watch me
    And stand by the bed and shiver as if she were cold
    Just to lie down beside me and touch me as if I were gold.

    One night of love don’t make up for six nights alone
    I’d rather have one than none Lord I’m flesh and bone
    Though sometimes it seems she ain’t worth the trouble at all
    She could be worth the world if somehow you can touch her at all.

    Right or wrong a woman can own any man
    She can take him inside her and hold his soul in her hand
    Then leave him as weak and weary as a newborn child
    Fighting to get his first breath and open his eyes.

    One night of love don’t make up for six nights alone
    I’d rather have one than none Lord I’m flesh and bone
    Though sometimes it seems she ain’t worth the trouble at all
    She could be worth the world if somehow you can touch her at all.
     
  5. Lookin' For A Feeling
    (Waylon Jennings)

    I’m lookin’ for a feeling that I once had with you
    Lookin’ for a feeling I have grown accustomed to
    I’ve had love and I’ve had lovers but they never seem to do
    I keep lookin’ for a feeling that I lost when I lost you.

    I said when it was over I’d be over you in time
    Because nothing lasts forever it’s all a state of mind
    I found one love I’ll find another heaven knows how hard I’ve tried
    But there’s something always missing something never satisfied.

    I keep lookin’ for a feeling that I once had with you
    Lookin’ for a feeling I have grown accustomed to
    I’ve had love and I’ve had lovers but they never seem to do
    I keep lookin’ for a feeling that I lost when I lost you. 
     
  6. It's Not Supposed To Feel That Way
     (Willie Nelson)

    It’s not supposed to be that way
    You’re supposed to know I love you
    But it don’t matter anyway
    If I can’t be there to console you.

    And like the other little children
    You’re gonna dream a dream or two
    But be careful what you’re dreamin’
    Or soon your dreams’ll be dreamin’ you.

    It’s not supposed to be that way
    You’re supposed to know I love you
    But it don’t matter anyway
    If I can’t be there to console you.

    When you go out to play this evenin’
    Play with fire flies till they’re gone
    Then you rush to meet your lover
    Play with real fire till the dawn.

    It’s not supposed to be that way
    You’re supposed to know I love you
    But it don’t matter anyway
    If I can’t be there to console you.
     
  7. I Can Get Off On You
    (Waylon Jennings - Willie Nelson)

    Take back the weed, take back the cocaine baby
    Take back the pills, take back the whiskey too
    I don’t need them now, your love was all I was after
    I’ll make it now, I can get off on you.

    I can get by on little
    Or nothing at all I know
    I can get high just thinkin’
    About you and so.

    Well, take back the weed, take back the cocaine baby
    Take back the pills, take back the whiskey too
    I don’t need them now, your love was all I was after
    I’ll make it now, I can get off on you.

    Who would have thought
    This was somethin’ that I’d ever do
    I’m working it out
    Mellowing out on you.

    Take back the weed, take back the cocaine baby
    Take back the pills, take back the whiskey too
    I don’t need them now, your love was all I was after
    I’ll make it now, I can get off on you.

    Take back the weed, take back the cocaine baby
    Take back the pills, take back the whiskey too
    I don’t need them now, your love was all I was after
    I’ll make it now, I can get off on you.
     
  8. Don't Cuss The Fiddle
    (Kris Kristofferson)

    I scandalized my brother
    While admitting that he sang some pretty songs
    I’d heard that he’d been scandalizing me
    And Lord, I knew that that was wrong.

    Now I’m looking at it over somethin’ cool
    And feeling fool enough to see
    What I had called my brother on
    Now he had every right to call on me.

    Don’t ever cuss that fiddle boy
    Unless you want that fiddle out of tune
    That picker there’s in trouble boy
    Ain’t nothin’ but another side of you.

    If we ever get to heaven boys
    It ain’t because we ain’t done nothin’ wrong
    We’re in this gig together
    So let’s settle down and steal each other’s song.

    I found a wounded brother
    Drinkin’ bitterly away the afternoon
    And soon enough he turned on me
    Like he’d done every face in that saloon.

    Well, we cussed him to the ground
    And said he couldn’t even steal a decent song
    But soon as it was spoken
    We was sad enough to wish that we were wrong.

    Don’t ever cuss that fiddle boy
    Unless you want that fiddle out of tune
    That picker there’s in trouble boy
    Ain’t nothin’ but another side of you.

    I know that it sounds silly
    But I think that I just stole somebody’s song
    She’s a good timin’ woman
    In love with a good two timin’ man.
    And she loves him in spite of the way
    That she don’t understand.
  9. Gold Dust Woman
    (Stevie Nicks)

    Rock on gold dust woman
    Take your silver spoon and dig your grave
    Heartless challenge
    Pick your path and I’ll pray

    Wake up in the mornin’
    See your sunrise loves to go down
    Lousy lovers pick their prey
    But they never cry out loud

    Well did he make you cry, make you break down
    Shatter your illusions of love?
    Is it over now, do you know how
    To pick up the pieces and go home?

    Rock on ancient queen
    Follow those who pale in your shadow
    Losers make bad lovers
    You better put your kingdom up for sale

    Well did he make you cry, make you break down
    Shatter your illusions of love?
    Is it over now, do you know how
    To pick up the pieces and go home?

    Did he make you cry, make you break down
    Shatter your illusions of love?
    Is it over now, do you know how
    To pick up the pieces and go home? 
     
  10. A Couple More Years
    (Shel Silverstein - Dennis Locorriere)

    I’ve got a couple more years on you baby that’s all
    I’ve had more chances to fly and more places to fall
    That’s not that I’m wiser it’s just that I’ve spent
    More time with my back to the wall.

    And I’ve picked up a couple more years on you baby that’s all
    I’ve walked a couple more roads than you baby that’s all
    And I’m tired of running while you’re only learning to crawl
    And you’re going somewhere but I’ve been to somewhere
    And found it was nowhere at all.

    And I’ve picked up a couple more years on you baby that’s all.

    Saying goodbye girl don’t ever come easy at all
    But you’ve got to fly cause you’re hearin’ them young eagles call
    Someday when you’re older you’ll smile at a man strong and tall
    And say I’ve got a couple more years on you baby that’s all.

    You’ll say I’ve got a couple more years on you baby that’s all
    I’ve had more chances to fly and more places to fall
    That’s not that I’m wiser it’s just that I’ve spent
    More time with my back to the wall.
     
  11. The Wurlitzer Prize
    (Chips Moman & Bobby Emmons)

    I’m not here to forget you
    I’m here to recall the things we used to say and do
    I don’t wanna get over you
    I don’t wanna get over you

    I haunt the same places we used to go
    Alone at a table for two
    I don’t wanna get over you
    I don’t wanna get over you

    They oughta give me the Wurlitzer Prize
    For all the silver I let slide down the slot
    Playin’ those songs sung blue
    That help me remember you
    I don’t wanna get over you

    A fresh roll o’ quarters, same old songs
    Missin’ you through and through
    I don’t wanna get over you
    I don’t wanna get over you

    They oughta give me the Wurlitzer Prize
    For all the silver I let slide down the slot
    Playin’ those songs sung blue
    They help me remember you
    ‘Cause I don’t wanna get over you
    I don’t wanna get over you
    I don’t wanna get over you